The Geomancer

8/3/06

Brasyl: Think BLADERUNNER in the Tropics

Presented for your viewing pleasure: the front cover of multiple-award winning author Ian McDonald's much-anticipated next novel, Brasyl. As it was with River of Gods, artwork is once again courtesy of Hugo-nominated artist Stephan Martiniere, with design by Jacqueline Cooke. (Right click to enlarge.)

Billed as Bladerunner in the tropics, , Brasyl will do for Brazil what River of Gods does for India. Speaking in the August 2006 issue of Locus, Ian says, "My book Brasyl is set in present-day Brazil (or what seems like it), in Sao Paulo 2032, and in 1732 Brazil just before the Jesuits were expelled. It revolves around the way quantum computing opens up multiple parallel universes... and, of course, a whole lot more besides." Brasyl will be published May, 2007.

8 comments:

  1. Brilliant, brilliant cover, once again. This Martiniere guy makes it look easy.

    That's not Anakin Skywalker hanging off the front of that little hovercar there, is it?

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  2. 'Tis indeed gorgeous, though I can't quite make out the street kids playing football. Must be the resolution on my screen or something.

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  3. Must be, surely. Glad you like it.

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  4. A very nice cover that reminds me of Blade Runner.

    And where, exactly, is the XXX bus (that is a bus?) heading? The mind boggles.

    But I do like the neon look, very cool. The book sounds very interesting as well. I'm interested to see how it tracks with the whole informational/quantum computing view of cosmology going around these days.

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  5. Glad you like it, JP. Meanwhile, the way it tracks is very interesting. Mind you, all I've read so far is a 60 page outline. The manuscript is do in to me in about 9 days... but Ian's take on the whole thing is very unique.

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  6. After reading River of Gods, this is an automatic purchase. Looking forward to it...

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  7. Yeah, I'm hopeful that's going to be a fairly common sentiment. Hell, it was my sentiment.

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