The Geomancer

12/8/10

Reviews Roundup, or Even More Reasons to Deplete Your Wallet

The Cardinal's BladesPierre Pevel's The Cardinal's Blades is "a truly ripping yarn with atmosphere to spar," says Rick Kleffel of The Agony Column. "Pevel has a great sense of the set-piece, which he uses in a somewhat overwhelming manner to introduce all the characters. But his sense of creating a historical background is superb, and Clegg's translation seems fully up to the task. Even though most of the book is plot, running here, fighting there, Pevel manages to convey a dark, dank and detailed backdrop. Here's a novel where the art direction in the prose plays a major part in the pleasure of reading" 

Ghosts of Manhattan"If anyone doubts there is a major renaissance in pulp fiction going on today, then pick up this old fashion thriller," writes the New York Journal of Books about George Mann's Ghosts of Manhattan, adding that the book adds many "cleverly written layers of suspense to an action packed adventure."

The Buntline Special: A Weird West Tale"The Buntline Special is fantastically steampunk, as one might expect in an 1881 Tombstone where Edison and Ned Buntline are free to experiment with electricity and weaponry," so says The Steampunk Librarian.  They write, "There are even mechanical prostitutes in town, to the interest of several of the menfolk in town. Readers familiar with the story of the Earp brothers, the Clanton gang, and Doc Holliday will find a fresh new angle with Resnick's storytelling, while those new to the Wild (and/or Weird) West can jump in with no worries. The Buntline Special is a real treat."

Shadowheart (Legends of the Raven 2)The Library Journal raves about James Barclay's Shadowheart. They say, "The sequel to Elfsorrow delivers more action-packed fantasy adventure with a deeper focus on the characters’ interpersonal relations. Barclay’s talent for depicting the carnage and frenzy of war gives his battle scenes a realism that brings home both the horrors experienced and the courage of its participants. Shadowheart. They say, "The sequel to Elfsorrow delivers more action-packed fantasy adventure with a deeper focus on the characters’ interpersonal relations. Barclay’s talent for depicting the carnage and frenzy of war gives his battle scenes a realism that brings home both the horrors experienced and the courage of its participants. VERDICT Military fantasy of the highest quality informs this powerful novel, which will appeal to fans of Glen Cook’s classic 'Black Company' novels."

The Greyfriar (Vampire Empire, Book 1)Preternatural Reviews just published their Best of 2010 list and Clay and Susan Griffith's The Greyfriar (Vampire Empire Book One) tops their list of Honorable Mentions. They write, "The Greyfriar is the first book in Susan and Clay Griffin's Vampire Empire (Am I the only one who finds that fun to say? Vampire Empire?) series and it's a fun ride.  Vampires and steampunk? More like Chocolate and peanut butter. Plus, through in the Greyfriar who escaped from the 1930's pulps and you've got yourself a helluva ride."

Meanwhile, Manga Maniac Cafe says,"The Greyfriar is a very fun book, and once I picked it up, it was very difficult to put it back down again.... For a rollicking read, look no further than The Greyfriar.  It’s fun, it’s exciting, and it flies by. I can hardly wait for the next book in the series. And, oh, that cover is to die for!"  

3 comments:

  1. I have to get around to writing my own review of The Cardinal's Blades. :)

    ReplyDelete